Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
  Robot Technology News  




Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















ROBO SPACE
Moving microswimmers with tiny swirling flows
by Staff Writers
Lemont IL (SPX) Apr 01, 2016


A rotating particle creates a flow that pushes swimming bacteria into a spiral-shaped halo around the center. The discovery helps scientists understand the interaction of microswimmers and could help prevent films from forming in microfluidic devices such as labs-on-a-chip. Image courtesy Igor Aronson and Andrey Sokolov. For a larger version of this image please go here.

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have discovered a way to use a microscopic, swirling flow to rapidly clear a circle of tiny bacteria or swimming robots.

"This discovery offers a new approach for control and manipulation of microscopic swimmers," said Argonne physicist and co-author Igor Aronson, and it could be useful in tiny microfluidic ("lab-on-a-chip") devices that can quickly run chemical or biological analyses or perform tasks.

In the study, published in Nature Communications, the researchers placed a magnetic particle in the center of a liquid film filled with swimming bacteria.

Normally the bacteria swim randomly; but when scientists spun the particle by applying a rotating magnetic field, the swimmers shot away from the center, like a school of fish that suddenly realized there's a shark in their midst.

What's actually happening is that the particle is rotating, creating a small vortex around itself. The bacteria swim parallel to the stream lines and are quickly pushed outwards - except for a few that get sucked in right next to the particle.

They're not pushed out by centrifugal force, said Argonne scientist Andrey Sokolov, who co-authored the paper; dead bacteria, which aren't swimming, are not pushed out with their living companions.

"Because of the curvature of the flow, some swim in and are trapped on the rotating particle, and others are forced to swim out of the curved flow," Sokolov said.

This technique could separate live from dead bacteria, or different species, bacterial strains or mutants from one another. "The shape and swimming rates of different species would mean they separate," Aronson said.

"At certain frequencies of rotation, the bacteria self-organize into a spiral-shaped halo, creating a microscopic galaxy - similar to our galaxy Milky Way, but trillions of trillions (1024) of times smaller," Sokolov said.

In addition to new understanding of the forces governing microswimmers and their environments, the vortex technique could help prevent biofilms from forming and disrupting microfluidic devices, the authors suggested.

They are particularly interested in creating systems in which microswimmers could assemble gears to build a tiny machine and then power it, Aronson said.

Aronson and Sokolov also modeled the results theoretically and saw good alignment between computer models and observed results, they said.

The results were published in Nature Communications in a study titled "Rapid expulsion of microswimmers by a vertical flow." The research was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science (Office of Basic Energy Sciences) and by the National Institutes of Health.

Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
Argonne National Laboratory
All about the robots on Earth and beyond!






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
ROBO SPACE
Microsoft grounds foul-mouthed teen-speak bot
San Francisco (AFP) March 24, 2016
A Microsoft "chatbot" designed to converse like a teenage girl was grounded on Thursday after its artificial intelligence software was coaxed into firing off hateful, racist comments online. Microsoft this week launched the experiment in which the bot nicknamed "Tay" was given the personality of a teenager and designed to learn from online exchanges with real people. Bu the plan was sent ... read more


ROBO SPACE
Filling the gap at Air Force Reserve

Drones promise to improve ecological monitoring

Pentagon, Other Federal Agencies Use Drones for Domestic Surveillance

Researchers develop miniaturized fuel cell that makes drones fly more than 1 hour

ROBO SPACE
A new model for how twisted bundles take shape

Local fingerprint of hydrogen bonding captured in experiments

Microagents with revolutionary potential

Printing nanomaterials with plasma

ROBO SPACE
Taiwan's TSMC signs deal for $3 bn plant in China

New terahertz source could strengthen sensing applications

NIST's 'optomechanical transducer' links sound, light, radio waves

Unlocking the gates to quantum computing

ROBO SPACE
France's EDF stands by UK nuclear plant timetable

Husband of Areva's ex-chief charged with insider trading: source

Rosatom Studies Ecological Method of Uranium Mining in Tanzania

Japan utility to scrap reactor over heavy safety costs

ROBO SPACE
US orders families of personnel out of southern Turkey

IS setbacks in Syria and Iraq

China beefs up airport security after Brussels attack

Algeria security forces kill 12 jihadists in a week

ROBO SPACE
Human impact forms 'striking new pattern' in Earth's global energy flow

Transforming the US transportation system by 2050 to address climate challenges

Economic growth no longer translates into more greenhouse gas: IEA

Long march in Bangladesh against Sundarbans power plant

ROBO SPACE
New method to make batteries with organic electrode materials

Separating charge and discharge in measuring future car batteries

New harmonized test protocols for PEM fuel cells in hydrogen vehicles

Creation of Jupiter interior, a step towards room temp superconductivity

ROBO SPACE
China's 1st space lab Tiangong-1 ends data service

China's aim to explore Mars

China to establish first commercial rocket launch company

China's ambition after space station




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement